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AMERICAN ROMANI CULTURAL VOCABULARY

KULTURANLNE SVATURYA ANDE AMARI SHIB



O Yanko le Redjosko
The Romani Archives and Documentation Center
The University of Texas at Austin

There are two extra letters in Romani spelling: X and double RR.  The X stands for the throat sound in such words as XA! “eat!” or XOXAVEL “he’s lying”; the RR stands for the other throat sound in such words as RROM “Gypsy man” or DARRO “wedding money”.  Pronounce CHORIMOS “stealing” and CHORRIMOS “poverty” to hear the difference.  ZH is the sound in ZHANAV “I know.” Also notice that K, P and T can have an H following: KH, PH, TH.  The H is sounded separately.  Say PEREL “he falls down” and PHEREL “he fills up” to hear the difference. V often sounds something like a W.

There are two main Romani dialects in the USA, Kalderashitska and Machvanitska (Machvanska).  Some words are different and also, where Kalderash has a G and a K, Machvano sometimes has DJ and CH.  Compare Kalderash BUKI, STAGI, Machvano BUCHI, STADJI, “work”, “hat.”

Abiàv

“wedding,” pl. abiavà.  Also biav

Amìra

Oath taken at the beginning of a kris, var. of next.

Amràn, Armàn

“curse,”  pl. armàya, amrìya

Anàv gazhikanò

Non-Romani name for use in dealings with the outside world.  This may be an arbitrary choice, or may be an anglicizing (hispanizing, etc.) of the Romani name, thus o Stanko le Michosko might call himself “Stan Mitchell” in English.  an individual may have several anavà gazhikanè, as well as a nickname (used only within the community).

Anàv rromanò

Romani name.This consists of a given name, plus a father’s name, plus a mother’s name, plus the name of the vitsa affiliation, thus o Stànko le Michòsko la Gezhàko ànda le Papinèshti vìtsa translates as “Stanko, son of Micho, son of Gezha, of the Papineshti clan.” In ordinary discourse, only the given name and the father’s name are used.

Ansurimè

“married,” of a man.

Arapo

An Arab man

Arxentìnurya

Rrom in North America whose ancestors migrated here through Argentina.

Bayash, boyash

Roma who don’t speak Romani, but a kind of Rumanian.  Sometimes wrongly applied to Romanichal Gypsies.

Bàyo

“trouble”

Bajur, bajour

Misspellings and mispronunciations of buzhò, q.v., popularized by a 1950s
Broadway stage production.

Bangyaràv

“I accuse,” also rrestisàvav, purrìv

Barò

See Rrom barò.

Bashaldò

Name of a Romani group originating in Hungary, lit. “musician”.

Baxt

“luck, fortune, fate”; also surruchimòs

Bèda

“trouble, problems.”

Bedàko

“troublemaker; troublesome.”  Pl. bedàcha.

Beng

“devil.”

Bèshiben

Word used in Northern Romani dialects equivalent to kris; lit. “sitting.”

Bezèx

“Sin, gross wrongdoing.”

Biandilo palpale

“Born again,” referring to Pentecostal church.

Bibàxt

“misfortune.”

Bibìo

Term of direct address to female elder (< bibì “aunt”).

Bikinimàski hertìya

“contract for sale (document).”

Bipachivalò

“dishonorable;” “dishonorable man.” Pronounced bipakivalò in
Russian Kalderash dialect

Biprinzharipè

“neglect, ignoring.”

Blakbolimè

“shunned by the community” (< Eng. “blackball(ed)”)

Blokimè

“shunned by the community” (< Eng. “block(ed)”)

Bolimè

“shunned by the community” (< Eng. “(black)ball(ed)”)

Bolimòs

“baptism.”

Bol

A blocking (from English “ball”).

Borì

“daughter in law; new bride.”

Butiàki hertìya

“contract for work (document)”

Buzhò

“a pouch.”  This is used in a confidence trick also called buzho, involving the exchanging of money for cut up paper. Pl. buzhurya.

Chapladò

“mentally impaired; mentally-impaired male.”

Chachimòs

“the truth.”

Chinasàra

The eve before a slàva, Kalderash dialect.

Civilians

A term sometimes applied by American Roma and Roma in Slovenia to the non-Romani population.

Chor

“thief”

Choràv

“I steal”

Choxanì

“a witch,” Also pron. choxayì.

Churàri

“member of a nàtsiya of Rrom,” q.q.v., pl. churàra.

Dadèski dey

“paternal grandmother”

Dàki dey

“maternal grandmother”

Dàrro

“dowry, given at a wedding.”

Das

Another word for a gazho in some southern European dialects of Romani, fem. dasnì.

Del

“God.”  Also Devèl.

Den kris

“they are holding a kris,” q.v.; “they are bringing judgment.”

Devèl

var. of Del, q.v.

Diklò

“scarf,” worn at the neck or on the head.  Also distributed at an abjav.  Pl. diklè.  Also diklorrò.

Dinò Devlèstar

“mentally deficient male,” lit. “God-given.”  Fem. dinì-Devlèstar.

Divàno

“conversation, discussion, advice session,” preferred to a kris as a means of settling a dispute.  “mai fedèr te huladjòn sar frenurya and’ekh divàno, de sar dushmàya and’ekh kris,” “it is better to part as friends from a divano, than as enemies from a kris.”

Divinìv

“I advise, I discuss.”

Dji, odjì, gi

Life force, “soul.”

Djukìv

“I confront.”

Dosh

“guilt, fault.”

Doshalò

“guilty”

Drab

“potion, medicine, drug.”

Drabaràv

“I apply medicine, I heal.”  Also, “I divine, I heal spiritually”

Drabarnì

“female diviner.”  In English commonly called a “reader,” and “advisor” or a “fortune teller.” See gichisvàra.

Drabèngro

“physician, pharmacist,” in northern Romani dialects.

Dukàto

“lawyer,” also avdukàto  Pl. dukàturya.

Durikeràv

“I predict the future” (from e.g. reading palms, tealeaves, coffee grounds, etc.).

Duryardò

Banished from the community.  Lit. “Sent afar.”

Falesho

The hem of a rromni’s traditional skirt.

Familìya, famìlya

“extended family.”

Farmechìv

“I curse, put a spell on.”

Gazhì

“adult female non-Romani person,” pl. gazhya.

Gazhikanì baxt

“bad luck,” lit. “non-Romani luck.”

Gazhikanò

“non-Romani,” adjectival form of gazhò.

Gazhikanò dukàto

“a non-Romani lawyer.”

Gazhò

“adult male non-Romani person,” pl. gazhè.

Galav

“bundle”

Gàlbeno

“gold coin” (lit. “yellow”); see next.

Gàlbi

Plural of prec., gold coins traditionally worn as a necklace or as buttons, as personal wealth, there being no access to banks, and their being available for paying/bribing officials.

Gichisvàra

“woman who claims to predict the future.”  For some speakers there is a distinction between a gichisvàra and a drabarnì, the former being a hustler, the latter being more “professional” and  proud of her skills.  The word means a “guesser” (me gichiv, “I guess”).

Glàba

“a fine.”  Paid, though not exclusively, as the result of a decision made by the krisnitòrya.

Glabìv

“I fine.”

Gomì

Another word for a gazho in some southern European Romani dialects.

Gonimè

“banished, driven out of the community.”  This does not necessarily have to be because the offender is ritually polluted.  See marimè.

Gonimòs

“expulsion from the community.”

Grèkurya

Rrom in America whose ancestors migrated via Greece.

Hezbyàna

“lesbian”

Inkàlka

“trespassing.”

Inkalkìv

“I am trespassing.”

Kàko

Term of direct address to respected male elder (< kak “uncle”).  Also Nàno.

Kalderàsh

Name applied to several Rrom groups, and their dialects. The term was originally occupational, meaning “coppersmith.”  Eastern and Western Kalderash populations (in e.g. Russia and Serbia) differ considerably in speech and custom.  Pl. Kalderàsha.

Khangeri

“church.”

Kapàra

“wedding gift.”

Ketrìntsa

apron worn over traditional skirt, symbolizing modesty.

Kidimòs

“meeting.”  Also kidinimòs.

Kinimàski hertìya

“contract for a sale (document).”

Kintàla

“spiritual balance, harmony.”
the Romani world view is a bipolar one, the universe falling naturally into pairs, though not all of them the antithesis of the other: Rrom-gazho, clean-defiled, God -the devil, male-female, luck-misfortune, upper body-lower body, sexual being-non-sexual being (see phurimòs) and so on.  Balance is upset by not observing the appropriate behavior.  Also kuntàla, kintuimòs. Cf. kintàri.

Kintàri

var. of kintàla, q.v., also kuntàri.

Kir(i)vì

“godmother.”

Kir(i)vò

“godfather.”

Kris, krìsi

The primary meaning of this word is “law” or “judgement;” thus e Devlèski kris, “God’s law,” e manushèski kris “the law of man, the tribunal or hearing which is part of the internal legal system. For some people kris is used to refer only to Romani law, while zakòno, q.v., is used to refer to non-Romani law.  There are similar judiciary councils of elders among other Romani groups, though not referred to by this name.

Kris bandjì

a kris resulting in a negative decision by the krisnitorya.

Kris chachì

a kris resulting in a positive decision by the krisnitorya.

Kris Rromanì

the tribunal or hearing which is part of the internal legal system amongst Rroma.

Krisàki shib

oratorical style of speaking Romani, at krisà but also heard at weddings, funerals and other formal occasions.  It is not appropriate for younger people to use this register.

Krisàki putyèrya

Power of the Romani tribunal

Krisàko

“legal.”

Krisàko kher

“courthouse.” Usu. in a non-Romani context.

Krisàlo rai

“judge.”

Krisari

Same as krisnitori: a judge at a kris.

Krisimè

“judged, sentenced.”

Krisìv

“I sentence, I judge, I condemn.”

Krisisardilèm

“I was sentenced, I was condemned.”  Also krisisàilem.

Krisnitòri

“judge at a kris;” also kriznitòri, krisitòri, krisari

Kukashtàra

“lavatory,” an impolite word.  Thòila in American Romani (< “toilet”).

Kumpànya

a work alliance, of colleagues, or family members, or members of unrelated Romani groups, which may last for just one job, or be of more or less permanent duration.  Also pron. kumpanìya.

Kununimè

“married.” 

Kununimòs

“wedding ceremony.”

Kununìl

“he performs marriage.” 

Kununisàvel

“he gets married.” 

Kùrva

“immoral woman; adulterous wife.”  Also, xàndra, lubnì, lugnì, bèshtiya.

Kurvàri

A man who solicits the company of immoral women; a whoremonger.

Kutàri

“whatsisname, so-and-so,” applied to a male.

Kutàrka

“whatsername, so-and-so,” applied to a female.

Lazh

shame, disgrace, immodesty, immorality. 

Lazhajmòs

shame, disgrace, immodesty, immorality. 

Lazhàv

shame, disgrace, immodesty, immorality. 

Lìra

Fifty dollars.  Panzh lìri ‘ $250.

Lovàri

A nàtsiya, q.v., of the Rrom, q.v., pl. Lovàra

Lovè

“money,” a plural noun.

Lubnì

the same as kùrva, q.v.

Machvànka

a Machvàno woman, pl. Machvànchi

Machvàno

One of the  nàtsiyi, q.v., originating in the region of Machva in eastern Serbia, pl. Machvàja. 

Magerdipè

Ritual pollution, defilement; word used in Central Romani dialects and in Polish and Russian Romani.

Magerdò

Ritually polluted or defiled.  Word used in Central Romani dialects and in Polish and Russian Romani.

Mahàla

“district, neighborhood, Gypsy quarter.”  Machvano word (also pòga).

Makhardò

Ritually polluted or defiled, lit. “smeared,” a reference to menstrual blood.

Mamì

kinship term, “grandmother.”

Mangimòs

“begging.”

Manùsh

a Romani population mainly inhabiting France, and closely related to the Sìnti and (historically) the Romanichals.  Lit. “men.”

Marimè

Term meaning ritually defiled or polluted, from the Greek meaning “to make dirty.”  Unlike pokelimè, this has the additional meaning of “banished from the community because of defilement.”  Not the same as gonimè, q.v.  Var. maxrimè, marimè.

Màrtja

“spirit of death”

Màrturo

a “witness,” Kalderash dialect

Melalò

“dirty,” also “shameful.”

Melyardò

“made dirty.”

Meretimè

“married,” of a woman. 

Mulò

“dead;” “the dead;” “spirits of the dead.”  Pl. mulè.  The mulè remain in the vicinity of the family, and keep watch over the activities of family members.  They cause prikàza, q.v., a signal that an individual has upset the balance required by rromanìya, q.v.

Nàtsiya

One of the divisions of the Romani population that includes the Kalderàsha, the Lovàra, the Machvàya and the Churàra, among others.  For some speakers, this word is used to mean these divisions themselves.

Nahìya

The geographical area of jurisdiction associated with the shàto, q.v.  Machvano dialect word.

Nashàv

“we flee.”  Sometimes a betrothed couple will “flee” from their families and consummate the union before the abyàv, thereby reducing the dàrro, q.v.  done as an economy measure.

Nashalàs

“we abduct,” also nashadaràs.  Sometimes the borì, q.v., will be “kidnapped” by members of the groom’s family; variation of the above.

Nashipè, nashimòs

“elopement.”

Nyàko, niyàko

A mattock, pole-axe, double-headed (axe and hammer) barò’s symbol of authority.

Nyàmo

“relative,” pl. njàmurya. 

Òfisa

“fortune-telling parlor” (< Eng. “office”).

Paplbno

“male homosexual”(slang)

Pachìv

“honor, respect, esteem.”  Kalderash var. pakìv.

Pachivalò

“honorable.”  Kalderash var. ‘ pakivalò.

Pal

Angloromani form of Common Romani phral meaning “brother.”  This has entered colloquial English, meaning “friend.”

Pàle chìdo

Sinti (q.v.) Romani equivalent of magerdò, q.v., lit. “put back.” Also chìdo pàle.

Paramìcha

“story,” pl. paramìchi

Parruimòs

“a barter, an exchange.”

Parruvàv

“I trade, barter.”

Pàrtiya

“Share, portion of earnings,” pl. pèrtsi. 

Pato

“bed,” a word adopted from Romanian.  Use of this word is considered indelicate in mixed company, the euphemism than (lit. “place”) being preferred.

Patrìn

“leaf,” pl. patri(n)ya.  Also “page” and “trail sign(s)”.

Pechàta

“brooch, badge,” formerly worn on the breast by the Rrom Baro to indicate his status.

Pekàla

“impurity,” var. of pekelimòs.

Phandadò1

“arrested, jailed.”

Phandadò2

“off limits, spoken-for,” of a town “owned” by a family or vìtsa, q.v.

Phurì

“a female elder.”

Phurì dai

“grandmother,” Northern Romani.  Equiv. ‘ mamì in American Romani.

Phurimòs

“age.”  A distinction is made between children and post-climacteric adults on the one hand, both outside of child-producing age, and persons in their young and middle adult years, who are able to reproduce and who have a “sexual” identity.  The judgment of an older person (e.g. at a kris) is considered to be more balanced because it is less subjective and emotional than that of a younger adult.

Phurò

“a male elder.”

Phurò them

“old country.”  American Rroma more commonly refer to any country in Europe, and to Europe generally, as the themà “countries.”

Pirrìv

“I inform (police).”  Also pupuìv.

Pirrimòs

“gossip, slander; informing (to police).”

Pochitayimòs

“dignity, esteem.”

Pochitayimòs rromanò

“high esteem within the romani community.” See also rrùndo.

Podàrka

“gift, present.”

Pòdja1

“slip, underskirt,” cf. telunì rròcha.

Pòdja2

“menstruation.”

Pòga

“district, neighborhood, area of jurisdiction.”

Pokàla

“sentence” (decided upon by the krisnitòrya).

Pokelimè

“defiled, impure,” also pekelimè.

Pokelimè and’o mui

“foul-mouthed.”

Pokelimòs

“defilement, impurity,” also pekelimè.

Pomàna

“a wake.” Pl. pomèni.

Pomenyàke tsàlya

“clothing worn by the one representing the deceased at a pomàna, q.v.

Porradì

“deflowered,” see next.

Porradì beshèl

(for females) “she is sitting immodestly with the legs apart,” lit. “spread apart.”

Porrajmòs

the Romani Holocaust (1933-1945), also Barò Porrajmòs, lit. The “great devouring, raping (of the Romani people).”

Pochinàv

“I pay.”  Kalderash var. pokinàv.

Pochinimòs

“payment.”  Pronounced pokinimòs in Kalderash Romani.

Pràzniko

“a religious festival or feast.”

Prikàza

“retribution,” misfortune or accident as a result of upsetting the balance of kintàla, q.v., through not observing right conduct (see vòrta Rromanì fòrma).  sometimes translated as “bad luck.”

Primàko, premàko

Male equivalent of a borì, q.v., son-in-law obliged to join wife’s family, usually for economic reasons.  This status is a shameful one.

Public

In American Gypsy English, this applies only to the Romani population at large, not to the non-Romani population.

Pupuìv

“I inform (police).”  Also pirrìv.

Pupuimòs

“gossip, slander; informing (to police).”

Raklì

“non-Romani girl,” as opposed to a shey.

Raklò

“non-Romani boy,” as opposed to a shavo.

Rango

Refers to the most important krisnitori (krisari) at a kris.

Ròmani

The English adjective (sometimes spelled Romany) for “Gypsy,” thus “the Romani people,” “the Romani language.”  The word is also used by itself to refer to the language (see also Romanes), and sometimes as a noun to mean a Romani person (“they are Romanies”). 

Rromanì buchì

Romani matters, typical Romani affairs. Kald. Rromani buki.

Ròmanichal

Name of a division of the Romani migration which entered France and then Britain.  British Romanichals have migrated to all parts of the English-speaking world.  In France spelt romanitchel.

Rràyo

“heaven.”

Rràso

A word meaning “race,” sometimes applied to distinguish Romani populations (as a Rràso) from other non-Romani rràsurya (pl.).

Rrestisàvav

“I accuse,” also bangyaràv, purrìv.

Rrobìya

“jail.”  Original European Romani meaning was “slavery.”

Rròbo

“prisoner.”  Original European Romani meaning was “slave.”

Rrom krisòngo

A Rrom who attends krisà as a krisnitòri, reputed for his fairness and whose participation is frequently sought.

Rrom krisàko

A krisnitòri.

Rrom barò

The leader of a Romani community.

Rrom

“person of Romani descent.”  However, because of their isolation, the Romani populations who were held in slavery for between five and six centuries in Romania have come to regard themselves alone as being the “real” Rrom, distinct from other non-Rrom Gypsy populations such as the Sìnti or the Bashaldè.  Nevertheless all non-Rrom populations refer to their culture and language as Romani, and use the word Rom (rather than the specifically Vlax Rrom) to mean either “Gypsy” or “husband.”  Pl. either Rrom or Rromà.

Rrom amerikàcha

Roma from the United States.

Rrom kanadàcha

Roma from Canada.

Rrom krisàko

Experienced older Rom with a reputation for fairness in serving as a krisnitòri, q.v.  Pl.  Rrom(à) krisànge.

Rrom mesik(an)àcha

Mexican Rom (pl.).

Rrom themènge

Rroma from Europe.

Rromàle shavàle

Term of address to a group, lit. “married men, unmarried men.”

Rromanè shavorrè

“Romani boys,” label of emphatic affirmation (because of the intentional tautology).

Rromanès

the adverb derived from Rromanì, meaning “Gypsily, in the Romani way.”  In Romani this grammatical form is used when referring to the language, thus dav duma Rromanès “I speak in the Romani way,” i.e. “I speak Romani.”  Using this adverbial form in English as though it were a noun is incorrect.

Rromanestàn

The notional homeland of the Romani people.

Rromanì

The singular subject-case adjective derived from Rrom.  Its use (as Romanì) for the name of the language in English derives from its function as a feminine singular adjective in Rromanì shib “Romani language.”

Rromanì fòrma

“correct behavior, behavior according to Rromanìya.

Rromanìya

“Romani culture, behavior and values; “Romaniness.”  Any behavior likely to defile or pollute, and therefore disturb kintàla and bring prikàza and bibàxt, is gazhikanìya, or “non-Romani ways. In other dialects it is Romanipè(n).

Rromnì

“married Romani female.”

Rrùndo

“rank, status.” Dav tut and’o rrùndo “I hold you in esteem.”

Rupunì rovlì

Clan leader’s baton.  lit. A silver rod.”

SavBpto

“sacrifice” (Machvanitsko)

Selìya

“bridal veil,” also vàla

Sèmno

Same as rupunì rovlì, q.v., lit. “Symbol, sign.” 

Shatra

“awning,” a tent without sides.

Shavò

“unmarried Romani male,” (as opposed to raklò, q.v.)

Shey

“unmarried Romani female,” (as opposed to raklì, q.v.). 

Shey-bori

See bori.

Shinavàs

“we agree upon, decide;” also, “we make an offer”

Shinavipè

“agreement, negotiation; decision; an offer.”

Shinèl (e) kris

“sentence, condemn”

Sìnto

member of a division of the Romani migration which moved into northern Europe, pl. Sìnti.  Today, Sìnti are found from France to Russia, and as far south as Austria and northern Italy.  They are particularly associated with Germany, and suffered the greatest losses there in the Holocaust.  Also Tsìnto.

Slàva

A saint’s day feast, such as St. George, St. Anne, etc.

Solàx

“an oath.”  Vov del solàx “he takes an oath.”

Stàgo

“wedding staff.”

Surruchimòs

“intent.”

Surruchìv

“I intend (to do something).”

Svatàsh

“spokesman, speaker”

Svàto

“word.”

Svedòko

“a witness,” Machvàno dialect.  also svidètelo

Svidetìv

“I bear witness” at a kris.

Shàto

A local leader or representative.  From E. “(big)shot.”
the wife of such an individual is a shatàika.

Shàtra

“clan, vitsa,” term used among Polish and Russian Romani speakers; lit. “awning, tent, canopy,” the meaning it retains in Kalderash; Cf. tsèrxa.

Sherèngro

“head man, leader,” in Northern Romani dialects.

Sherèskro

“head man, leader,” in Norhtern Romani dialects.

Sherò Rrom

“head man, leader.”  Common term in European Romani; usu. shato
In North America.  Also shorò Rrom.

Stràzha

“Banishment.”

Strazhimè

Banished from the community.

Shùniben

“a hearing.”  Northern European Romani dialects.

Tèkteri

“detective.” 

Tekterìca

“female detective.”

Teljàri

“dollar.”  Glàbi, dàrrurya, q.v. etc., are paid in dollars counted in lìri (see lìra).

Telunì rròcha

“slip, petticoat.”  This garment is “unclean” and can be used to disgrace and defile a man if it is brought into contact with his head.  Also teluvì rròcha, telaluyì rròcha.  Cf. pòdja.

Than

The word for “place” used to mean “bed.”  Bed is pato.

Tharayimòs

“deception.”

Tharàv

“I mislead.”

Tomùya

“incense (frankincense), used for purifying house.”

Trushùl

“cross.”

Tsepenimòs

“deadlock, stalemate,” at a kris.

Tsèrxa

Among Lovàra, the name used for clan; the equivalent of vìtsa, literally “tent.”  See also shàtra.

Turvinipè

“advice,” also sovèto, divinimòs

Vàla

“bridal veil,” also selìya.

Vèchera

“eve before a slàva,” Machvano dialect.  See Chinasàra, Zhjno.

Velinimòs

“slander.”

Velinìv

“I slander.”

Vìtsa

“clan,” among some Romani-speaking groups.  A vìtsa may descend from a common ancestor, or from a common occupational group during slavery, or it may have separated from another vìtsa which had grown too big.  From a Slavic word meaning “vine” or “offshoot.”  Pl. vìtsi.  See also tsèxra.

Vlax

Designation of a division of the Romani population which traces its ancestry in Europe to the former slaveholding principalities of Wallachia (hence Vlax) and Moldavia, now Romania.  Also written Vlach, though this spelling can also refer to a separate and unrelated population of indigenous Romanian origin.  See Rrom.

Vòrta Rromanì fòrma

The correct observance of Romani behavior and ritual necessary to maintain spiritual cleanliness and balance, and to avoid marimos. lit. “right Romani way.”

Vortàko

“male partner; work partner,” pl. vortàcha

Vozdèla

“trust.”

Vuluv

the curtain covering the entrance to a tent.

Vuzhilè

“being in debt.”  Me dav lèske vudzhilè “I make him a loan,” me lem vudzhilè “I borrowed.”  Also udzhilè.

Vuzhilimòs

“a loan; a debt.”

Vuzhyardò

“(declared) clean,” at a kris, after earlier having being declared marimè.

Vuzhò

“clean,” both physically and/or spiritually.

Xalò

Another word for a gazho, in Sinti and other Northern European dialects of Romani.

Xanamìk

what each spouse’s father is to the other: in some dialects, brother or sister in law.  Pl. xanamikà.

Xoxayimòs

“a lie.”

Xoxamnì solàx

“a false oath.”

Xoxamnò

“a liar.”

Xoraxanò

“Muslim (especially a Balkan Turk); member of an Islamic Romani population.”  Pl. xoraxanè.

Xoxayipè

“a lie; deceit.”  Also xoxajimòs.

Yàdo

“world outside of the Romani environment.”  Sometimes used to mean “hell.”

Yakhalò

“the evil eye,” although this word may also mean “attractive.”

Zakòno

“law,” sometimes non-Romani law in particular, as opposed to kris.  Pl. zakòya or zakònurya.

Zhandàri

“policeman.”  Pl. zhandària.

Zhùno

“evening before a holiday;” Zhùno Krichunòsko, “Christmas Eve.”